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Rapper's Delight


Sugarhill Gang • 1979 • Single

While it was not the first single to feature rapping, it is generally considered to be the song that introduced hip hop music to audiences in the United States and around the world. The song is ranked #251 on the Rolling Stone magazine's list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time and #2 on VH1's 100 Greatest Hip-Hop Songs. It is also included in NPR's list of the 100 most important American musical works of the 20th century. It was preserved into the National Recording Registry by the Library of Congress in 2011. Songs on the National Recording Registry are "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant."

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The Payback


James Brown • 1973 • 8 Songs

The Payback is considered a high point in Brown's recording career, and is now regarded by critics as a landmark funk album. Its revenge-themed title track, a #1 R&B hit, is one of his most famous songs and an especially prolific source of samples for record producers. Musically the album is largely cyclic grooves and jamming, but it also features departures into a softer soul-based sound on tracks like "Doing the Best I Can".

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The Last Poets


The Last Poets • 1970 • 13 Songs

The Last Poets is the debut spoken word album, released in 1970, by The Last Poets. The song "Wake Up, Niggers" is featured on the Performance soundtrack album, also released in 1970.

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Rock Steady


Aretha Franklin • 1971 • Single

"Rock Steady" is a song written and performed by Aretha Franklin and released in 1971, from the album Young, Gifted and Black.[3] The single reached the #9 spot on the Billboard Hot 100 charts that same year. It also peaked at #2 on the Best Selling Soul Singles chart. The B-side, "Oh Me Oh My (I'm a Fool for You Baby)" peaked at #73 on the Billboard Hot 100 and #9 on the Best Selling Soul Singles chart.

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King Tim III


The Fatback Band • 1979 • Single

"King Tim III (Personality Jock)" is a 1979 song by the Fatback Band from the disco album XII. Released on March 25, 1979, a few months before "Rapper's Delight" (which is widely regarded as the first commercially released hip hop song), this song is often cited as the beginning of recorded hip hop. The title refers to vocalist Tim Washington.

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The Revolution Will Not Be Televised


Gil Scott-Heron • 1971 • Single

"The Revolution Will Not Be Televised" is a poem and song by Gil Scott-Heron. Scott-Heron first recorded it for his 1970 album Small Talk at 125th and Lenox, on which he recited the lyrics, accompanied by congas and bongo drums. A re-recorded version, with a full band, was the B-side to Scott-Heron's first single, "Home Is Where the Hatred Is", from his album Pieces of a Man (1971). It was also included on his compilation album, The Revolution Will Not Be Televised (1974). All these releases were issued on the Flying Dutchman Productions record label.

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Funk You Up


The Sequence • 1979• Single

"Funk You Up" is a 1979 old school hip hop song recorded by The Sequence for Sugar Hill Records. It is significant as the first hip-hop song to be released by a female rap group (and by a rap group from the Southern United States, as all three members of The Sequence were natives of Columbia, South Carolina), and was the second single released on Sugar Hill, following "Rapper's Delight" by the Sugarhill Gang.

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Rap-O Clap-O


Joe Bataan • 1978 • Single

Few artists can claim to be as prescient about spotting and creating new trends as Joe Bataan. In the ’60s, he saw how boogaloo and doo-wop fit together and turned them into “Gypsy Woman.” Combining salsa and soul, he created Salsoul, one of the most beloved record labels of the disco era. Citing financial disagreements with the other owners behind the imprint, Bataan had left Salsoul by the late ’70s. But he wasn’t done musically: A party in a community center convinced him to get in the studio once again. What resulted was one of the first rap songs to ever be recorded, “Rap-O Clap-O.”

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DJ Kool Herc is a DJ from New York


Known as the "father of hip hop", Clive Campbell, better known by his stage name DJ Kool Herc, is a Jamaican American DJ who is credited for originating hip hop music in the early 1970s in The Bronx, New York City. His playing of hard funk records of the sort typified by James Brown was an alternative both to the violent gang culture of the Bronx and to the nascent popularity of disco in the 1970s. Campbell began to isolate the instrumental portion of the record, which emphasized the drum beat—the "break"—and switch from one break to another. Using the same two turntable set-up of disco DJs, Campbell used two copies of the same record to elongate the break. This breakbeat DJing, using hard funk and records with Latin percussion, formed the basis of hip hop music. Campbell's announcements and exhortations to dancers helped lead to the syncopated, rhymed spoken accompaniment now known as rapping.

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The Sugarhill Gang is a group from New Jersey


The Sugarhill Gang is an American hip hop group, known mostly for its 1979 hit "Rapper's Delight," the first rap single to become a Top 40 hit on the Billboard Hot 100. The song uses an interpolation of the instrumental track from the hit "Good Times" by Chic as its foundation. The members, all from Englewood, New Jersey, consisted of Michael "Wonder Mike" Wright, Henry "Big Bank Hank" Jackson, and Guy "Master Gee" O'Brien. The three were assembled into a group by producer Sylvia Robinson, who founded Sugar Hill Records with her husband, record producer Joe Robinson. The group and the record company are named after the Sugar Hill, Harlem, neighborhood.

Albums

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James Brown is a singer from South Carolina


James Joseph Brown (May 3, 1933 – December 25, 2006) was an American singer, songwriter, record producer, dancer and bandleader. The founding father of funk music and a major figure of 20th century popular music and dance, he is often referred to as the "Godfather of Soul". In a career that spanned six decades, he influenced the development of several music genres, including Hip Hop.

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Grandmaster Flash is a DJ from New York


Joseph Saddler (born January 1, 1958), better known as Grandmaster Flash, is a Bajan-born (from Barbados) American hip hop recording artist and DJ. He is considered to be one of the pioneers of hip-hop DJing, cutting, and mixing. Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2007, becoming the first hip hop act to be so honored.

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Afrika Bambaataa is a DJ from New York


Afrika Bambaataa is an American disc jockey from the South Bronx, New York. He is notable for releasing a series of genre-defining electro tracks in the 1980s that influenced the development of hip hop culture. Afrika Bambaataa is one of the originators of breakbeat DJing and is respectfully known as "The Godfather" and "Amen Ra of Hip Hop Kulture", as well as the father of electro funk. Through his co-opting of the street gang the Black Spades into the music and culture-oriented Universal Zulu Nation, he has helped spread hip hop culture throughout the world.

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Kurtis Blow is a rapper from New York


Kurt Walker (born August 9, 1959), professionally known by his stage name Kurtis Blow, is an American rapper and record producer. He is the first commercially successful rapper and the first to sign with a major record label. "The Breaks", a single from his 1980 debut album, is the first certified gold record rap song. Throughout his career he has released 15 albums and is currently an ordained minister.

Rapper's Delight
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The Payback
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The Lost Poets
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Rocksteady
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King Tim III
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This Revolution Will Not Be Televised
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The Sequence
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Rap-O Clap-O
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DJ Kool Herc
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Sugarhill Gang
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James Brown
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Grandmaster Flash
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Afrika Bammbattaa
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Kurtis Blow
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“Now, what you hear is not a test - I'm rappin' to the beat
And me, the groove, and my friends are gonna try to move your feet.”
-Sugarhill Gang (“Rapper's Delight” 1979)

DEAD PRESIDENT

Noun

A term refering to American paper currency. Cash. Can be used to discuss $1, $2, $5, $10, $20, $50, and $100 bills. Used because most American bills have deceased former U.S. Presidents on the front.